Spotlight on Mike Bird-Romero

Mike Bird-Romero is an accomplished jeweler known for his technical mastery, innovation, and respect for historical techniques and designs.

Born in 1946 in San Juan Pueblo, his artistic interests were fostered in a household of creativity.

His grandmother Luteria Atencio was a respected potter whose works are in the Smithsonian Institution. His mother Lorencita Bird was an accomplished and well-known Pueblo textile artist and educator. After learning some basic metal-working skills in junior high school, Mike began serious work with metals in the late 1960s, teaching himself from books on the topic and buying some old tools while making others. By the 1980s, Mike had emerged as a major figure in contemporary Native American jewelry making. Selecting only the best, most dramatic materials, Mike became known for bold, sculptural interpretations of traditional designs.

Although he is largely a self-taught artist, Mike’s work has been influenced both by extensive research into historic Navajo and Pueblo jewelry and by observing great silversmiths who lived near his home including Mark Chee and Julian Lovato. A true student of Pueblo tradition, Mike is inspired by old photographs of Indians wearing historical jewelry. “I am trying to revive the old jewelry,” he explains.

A beautiful display of San Juan Pueblo artist Mike Bird Romero atop the “Heart of the Dragonfly” book which was written by Mike Bird Romero’s late wife, Allison Bird.
Mike Bird-Romero speaks to guests during Bird’s show at Four Winds Gallery back in May 2018.
Mike Bird-Romero at his booth during the SWAIA 2019 Indian Market in Santa Fe. 
Mike Bird-Romero (left) jokes around withFour Winds Gallery owner John Krena at the conclusion of the most recent  show at Four Winds Gallery back in May 2018.
“In the Spirit of our Ancestors”, co-authored by Allison Bird and John Krena highlights a very deep collection of tribal and pueblo art belonging to Keith Kappmeyer. Mike Bird’s late wife, Allison, was a highly regarded expert researcher and author on Native American subjects.
Mike Bird-Romero (left) speaks of his work with long-time gallery friends Gregory Mason and wife Stacey Hornell-Mason while Four Winds Gallery owner John Krena displays jewelry by Bird during a show at Four Winds Gallery back in May 2018.
San Juan Pueblo Jeweler Mike Bird-Romero uses the highest quality materials in each and every piece of jewelry he creates, making it truly special and one of a kind. 
San Juan Pueblo jeweler Mike Bird-Romero uses the highest quality materials in each and every piece of jewelry he creates, making it truly special and one of a kind. 
A display of cuffs made by San Juan Pueblo Jeweler Mike Bird-Romero currently available at Four Winds Gallery.
mike bird romero necklaces
Beautiful details of a silver cuff by San Juan Pueblo jeweler Mike Bird-Romero during a show at Four Winds Gallery back in May 2018.
Mike Bird-Romero (right) places a necklace on Stephanie Sprowls while Bird’s daughter looks on prior to the start of Bird’s show at Four Winds Gallery back in May 2018.
Born in to a family of artists, Bird’s creativity blossomed from early on in his life, here is a photograph of (from left to right) Grandmother Luteria Atencio, an unidentified niece to Atencio, and Aunt Gegorita Trujillo photographed selling their art under the Governor’s Palace, date of photo, unknown.
A display of cuffs made by San Juan Pueblo jeweler Mike Bird-Romero during a show featuring Bird at Four Winds Gallery back in May 2018.